Биографии и Мемуары

Различные книги в жанре Биографии и Мемуары

A Friar's Tale

John Collins

Remembering Fr. Benedict Groeschel, CFR</p><p>Defender of the outcast, acclaimed teacher and spiritual director, insightful psychologist, and founding member of a thriving religious community, Father Benedict J. Groeschel was not merely a man of uncommon talents but one of extraordinary achievements.</p><p>Yet at heart he was a simple friar, a humble priest; and his goal in life was very modest: to follow as best he could the path God had chosen for him.</p><p>For over eighty years-more than fifty of them as a priest-Father Groeschel faithfully walked that path; and, in so doing, he gave hope to abandoned youth, to pregnant women who were homeless and alone, to many of those people whom society so easily and thoughtlessly discards.</p><p>An electrifying speaker and a writer of real talent, he was responsible for rekindling the love for God in the hearts of many whose faith had turned to ashes. And his legendary devotion to the poor led him to help found the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal, with the mission to serve those who had little or nothing.</p><p><b>A Friar's Tale</b> is an inspiring, moving, and sometimes humorous biography that invites readers to immerse themselves in the fascinating details of a remarkable life, one animated by faith and devoted to love.

Emily Carr

Kate Braid

As a child she was «contrary,»as a young woman she defied convention to choose art over marriage, and as a middle-aged woman she was considered a full-blown eccentric. Listening to her own inner voice, Emily Carr created an art unique to British Columbia.

Erebus

Michael Palin

Driven by a passion for travel and history and a love of ships and the sea, former Monty Python stalwart and beloved television globe-trotter Michael Palin explores the world of HMS Erebus, last seen on an ill-fated voyage to chart the Northwest Passage. Michael Palin brings the fascinating story of the Erebus and its occupants to life, from its construction as a bomb vessel in 1826 through the flagship years of James Clark Ross’s Antarctic expedition and finally to Sir John Franklin’s quest for the holy grail of navigation—a route through the Northwest Passage, where the ship disappeared into the depths of the sea for more than 150 years. It was rediscovered under the arctic waters in 2014. Palin travels across the world—from Tasmania to the Falkland Islands and the Canadian Arctic—to offer a firsthand account of the terrain and conditions that would have confronted the Erebus and her doomed final crew. Delving into the research, he describes the intertwined careers of the two men who shared the ship’s journeys: Ross, the organizational genius who mapped much of the Antarctic coastline and oversaw some of the earliest scientific experiments to be conducted there; and Franklin, who, at the age of sixty and after a checkered career, commanded the ship on its last disastrous venture. Expertly researched and illustrated with maps, photographs, paintings, and engravings, Erebus is an evocative account of two journeys: one successful and forgotten, the other tragic yet unforgettable.

Late Beethoven

Maynard Solomon

This One Looks Like a Boy

Lorimer Shenher

Inspiring and honest, this unique memoir of gender transition and coming-of-age proves it&rsquo;s never too late to find your true identity. Since he was a small child, Lorimer Shenher knew something for certain: he was a boy. The problem was, he was growing up in a girl&rsquo;s body. In this candid and thoughtful memoir, Shenher shares the story of his gender journey, from childhood gender dysphoria to teenage sexual experimentation to early-adult denial of his identity&mdash;and finally the acceptance that he is trans, culminating in gender reassignment surgery in his fifties. Along the way, he details his childhood in booming Calgary, his struggles with alcohol, and his eventual move to Vancouver, where he became the first detective assigned to the case of serial killer Robert Pickton (the subject of his critically acclaimed book That Lonely Section of Hell). With warmth and openness, This One Looks Like A Boy takes us through one of the most important decisions Shenher will ever make, as he comes into his own and finally discovers acceptance and relief.

The Vegetarian's Guide to Eating Meat

Marissa Landrigan

Growing up in a household of food-loving Italian-Americans, Marissa Landrigan was always a black sheep&#151;she barely knew how to boil water for pasta. But at college, she thought she&#8217;d found her purpose. Buoyed by animal rights activism and a feminist urge to avoid the kitchen, she transformed into a hardcore vegan activist, complete with shaved head.But Landrigan still hadn&#8217;t found her place in the world. Striving to develop her career and maintain a relationship, she criss-crossed the U.S. Along the way, she discovered that eating ethically was far from simple&#151;and cutting out meat was no longer enough. As she got closer to the source of her food, eventually even visiting a slaughterhouse and hunting elk, Landrigan realized that the most ethical way of eating was to know her food and prepare it herself, on her own terms, to eat with family and friends.Part memoir and part investigative journalism, The Vegetarian&#8217;s Guide to Eating Meat is as much a search for identity as it is a fascinating treatise on food.

Demon in My Blood

Elizabeth Rains

Until recently, hepatitis C&#151;which infects 170 million people throughout the world&#151;was always fatal. But today there is finally a remarkable cure.Elizabeth Rains describes how she was likely infected with hepatitis C during her wild hippie days, how she was diagnosed more than four decades later, and how she became one of the early patients to be cured, including the obstacles she encountered in gaining access to the $100,000 drugs. She describes the symptoms&#151;and non-symptoms&#151;of hep c, the stigma that still accompanies a diagnosis, the grueling interferon treatments that many hep C patients have had to undergo, and the new antivirals that have exploded onto the pharmaceutical market and that provide a cure but at a tremendously high price.Because most people who have hepatitis C have no idea they harbor the disease, Rains&#8217; riveting account will compel readers to get tested for this silent killer.

I Am Nobody

Greg Gilhooly

”I Am Nobody is an honest, tragic account of child sexual abuse and a powerful resource for individuals struggling with recovery. Gilhooly clearly highlights the shortcomings of the Canadian justice system’s approach; hopefully, one day, the punishment will fit the crime." &#8212Sheldon Kennedy, former NHL player and author of Why I Didn't Say Anything In this raw, unflinching look at how his dream of playing hockey was stolen from him by charismatic hockey coach and sexual predator Graham James, Greg Gilhooly describes in anguishing detail the mental torment he suffered both during and long after the abuse and the terrible reality behind the sanitized term “sexual assault.” Although James has been convicted of sexually assaulting some of his victims, including Sheldon Kennedy and Theo Fleury, he neither confessed in court nor was convicted of sexually assaulting many of his other victims, including Gilhooly, depriving him of the judicial closure he craved. Gilhooly also provides a valuable legal perspective—as both a victim and a lawyer—missing from other such memoirs, and he delivers a powerful indictment of a legal system that, he argues, does not adequately deal with serial sexual child abuse or allocate enough resources to the rehabilitation of the victim. Most important, Gilhooly offers hope, affirmation, and inspiration for those who have suffered abuse and for their loved ones.

An Intimate Wilderness

Norman Hallendy

Arctic researcher, author, and photographer Norman Hallendy&#8217;s journey to the far north began in 1958, when many Inuit, who traditionally lived on the land, were moving to permanent settlements created by the Canadian government. In this unique memoir, Hallendy writes of his adventures, experiences with strange Arctic phenomena, encounters with wildlife, and deep friendships with Inuit elders. Very few have worked so closely with the Inuit to document their traditions, and, in this book, Hallendy preserves their voices and paints an incomparable portrait of a vibrant culture in a remote landscape.

Barefoot at the Lake

Bruce Fogle

Every year, from the end of June to the end of August, Bruce and his family go to their cedar-clad cottage on the blue, wide lake. At first, this summer of 1954 seems like any other: floating in the row boat with Grace from next door, jumping off the diving raft, eating peach pie, exploring with Angus the dog, watching the seagulls, frogs and herons and catching crayfish.But just when he realizes life is perfect, everything starts to change. He&#8217;s ten, the family dynamics are shifting, and over the summer both the harshness of the adult world and the patterns of the natural world reveal themselves. By the time the weather turns he will be a different child, and will have chosen his own path to understanding the wilderness that waits behind their wooden homes. Funny, subtle and true, Barefoot at the Lake transports us to a long, hot, poignant summer.