Tom Stoppard

Список книг автора Tom Stoppard


    Night and Day

    Tom Stoppard

    Night and Day was originally staged in 1978 at the Phoenix Theatre in London, directed by Peter Wood and starring Maggie Smith. The production moved to New York in 1979. The play was revised significantly for its revival at the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco in 2002. Grove is republishing titles by Stoppard that were previously published by FSG (including Arcadia , Indian Ink , and The Real Thing ) and updating our Stoppard backlist to give these books a fresh look. We are also publishing the old FSG titles in ebook for the first time.

    Five European Plays

    Tom Stoppard

    Grove is reissuing all of Stoppard’s backlist, including the books previously published by FSG, in new, beautiful, definitive editions.

    The Real Thing

    Tom Stoppard

    The Real Thing won the 1984 Tony Award for Best Play, the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding New Play, and the 1982 Evening Standard Award for Best Play. The Real Thing has sold nearly 20,000 copies in the US to date. The Real Thing was first performed in 1982 at The Strand Theatre in London, starring Felicity Kendal and Roger Rees and produced by Michael Codron. It was subsequently transferred to the Plymouth Theatre on Broadway in a production by Emanuel Azenberg starring Glenn Close and Jeremy Irons. The play was revived in 2000 on Broadway and in London, then again on Broadway in a 2014 production directed by Sam Gold, starring Ewan McGregor and Maggie Gyllenhaal. Grove is republishing titles by Stoppard that were previously published by FSG (including Arcadia , Indian Ink , and The Real Thing ) and updating our Stoppard backlist to give these books a fresh look. We are also publishing the old FSG titles in ebook for the first time.

    Indian Ink

    Tom Stoppard

    Indian Ink is an expansion of Stoppard’s 1991 radio drama In the Native State , which was inspired by his childhood years in 1940s Darjeeling. A neglected gem in Stoppard’s oeuvre, Indian Ink is recapturing the attention of American audiences. It was recently revived in a 2015 production at the American Conservatory Theater (ACT) in San Francisco directed by Carey Perloff. Perloff also directed an Off-Broadway production at the Laura Pels Theatre in 2014, featuring Rosemary Harris, Romola Garai, and Firdous Bamji. The play was nominated for the 2015 Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Revival. Indian Ink originally premiered at the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre, Guildford, and opened at the Aldwych Theatre in London, on February 27, 1995, directed by Peter Wood. The play had its American premiere in 1999 at the ACT, directed by Perloff. It was produced Off-Off-Broadway at Walkerspace in 2003, directed by Ashok Sinha. Grove is republishing titles by Stoppard that were previously published by FSG (including Arcadia , Indian Ink , and The Real Thing ) and updating our Stoppard backlist to give these books a fresh look. We are also publishing the old FSG titles in ebook for the first time.

    Voyage

    Tom Stoppard

    Comprising of three sequential plays, The Coast of Utopia chronicles the story of romantics and revolutionaries caught up in a struggle for political freedom in an age of emperors.The Coast of Utopia is Tom Stoppard’s long-awaited and monumental trilogy that explores a group of friends who come of age under the Tsarist autocracy of Nicholas I, and for whom the term “intelligentsia” was coined. Among them are the anarchist Michael Bakunin, who was to challenge Marx for the soul of the masses; Ivan Turgenev, author of some of the most enduring works in Russian literature; the brilliant, erratic young critic Vissarion Belinsky; and Alexander Herzen, a nobleman's son and the first self-proclaimed socialist in Russia, who becomes the main focus of this drama of politics, love, loss and betrayal. In The Coast of Utopia, Stoppard presents an inspired examination of the struggle between romantic anarchy, utopian idealism and practical reformation in what The New York Times calls, “The biggest theatrical event of the year. . . . Brilliant, sprawling. . . . A rich pageant.”

    Jumpers

    Tom Stoppard

    Tom Stoppers's play «Jumpers» is both a high-spirited comedy and a serious attempt to debate the existence of a moral absolute, of metaphysical reality, of God. Michael Billington in «The Guardian» described the play succinctly: «The new Radical Liberal Party has made the ex-Minister of Agriculture Archbishop of Cantebury, British astronauts are scrapping with each other on the moon, and spritely academics steal about London by night indulging in murderous gymnastics: this is the kind of manic, futuristic, topsy-turvy world in which Stoppard's dazzling new play is set. And if I add that the influences apparently include Wittgenstein, Magritte, the Goons, Robert Dhery, Joe Orton, and The Avengers, you will have some idea of the heady brew Stoppard has here concocted.» The protagonist incude an aging Professor Of Moral Philosophy – trying to compose a lecture on «Man – Good, Bad or Indifferent» – while ignoring a corpse in the next room; his beautiful young wife, an ex-musical comedy Queen, lasciviously entertaining his university boss down the hall; her husband's specially trained hare, Thumpers; and a chorus of gymnasts, Jumpers.

    Travesties

    Tom Stoppard

    "Travesties" was born out of Stoppard's noting that in 1917 three of the twentieth century's most crucial revolutionaries – James Joyce, the Dadaist founder Tristan Tzara, and Lenin – were all living in Zurich. Also living in Zurich at this time was a British consula official called Henry Carr, a man acquainted with Joyce through the theater and later through a lawsuit concerning a pair of trousers. Taking Carr as his core, Stoppard spins this historical coincidence into a masterful and riotously funny play, a speculative portrait of what could have been the meeting of these profoundly influential men in a germinal Europe as seen through the lucid, lurid, faulty, and wholly riveting memory of an aging Henry Carr.

    Rock 'n' Roll

    Tom Stoppard

    Rock ’n’ Roll is an electrifying collision of the romantic and the revolutionary. It is 1968 and the world is ablaze with rebellion, accompanied by a sound track of the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan. Clutching his prized collection of rock albums, Jan, a Cambridge graduate student, returns to his homeland of Czechoslovakia just as Soviet tanks roll into Prague. When security forces tighten their grip on artistic expression, Jan is inexorably drawn toward a dangerous act of dissent. Back in England, Jan’s volcanic mentor, Max, faces a war of his own as his free-spirited daughter and his cancer-stricken wife attempt to break through his walls of academic and emotional obstinacy. Over the next twenty years of love, espionage, chance, and loss, the extraordinary lives of Jan and Max spin and intersect until an unexpected reunion forces them to see what is truly worth the fight.

    Lord Malquist and Mr. Moon

    Tom Stoppard

    Tom Stoppard’s first novel, originally published in 1966 just before the premiere of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, is an uproarious fantasy set in modern London. The cast includes a penniless, dandified Malquist with a liveried coach; Malquist’s Boswellian biographer, Moon, who frantically scribbles as a bomb ticks in his pocket; a couple of cowboys, one being named Jasper Jones; a lion who’s banned from the Ritz; an Irishman on a donkey claiming to be the Risen Christ; and three irresistible women.

    Shipwreck

    Tom Stoppard

    The Coast of Utopia is Tom Stoppard’s long-awaited and monumental trilogy that explores a group of friends who come of age under the Tsarist autocracy of Nicholas I, and for whom the term “intelligentsia” was coined. Among them are the anarchist Michael Bakunin, who was to challenge Marx for the soul of the masses; Ivan Turgenev, author of some of the most enduring works in Russian literature; the brilliant, erratic young critic Vissarion Belinsky; and Alexander Herzen, a nobleman's son and the first self-proclaimed socialist in Russia, who becomes the main focus of this drama of politics, love, loss and betrayal. In The Coast of Utopia, Stoppard presents an inspired examination of the struggle between romantic anarchy, utopian idealism and practical reformation in what The New York Times calls, “The biggest theatrical event of the year. . . . Brilliant, sprawling. . . . A rich pageant.”