A Storm of Swords. Джордж Р. Р. Мартин

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Название A Storm of Swords
Автор произведения Джордж Р. Р. Мартин
Жанр Героическая фантастика
Серия A Song of Ice and Fire
Издательство Героическая фантастика
Год выпуска 0
isbn 9780007447756



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      GEORGE R.R. MARTIN

      A STORM OF SWORDS

      PART ONE: STEEL AND SNOW

      BOOK THREE OF

      A Song of Ice and Fire

      Copyright

      HarperVoyager

      An imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers

      1 London Bridge Street

      London SE1 9GF

      www.harpervoyagerbooks.com

      Previously published in paperback by Voyager in 2001, 2003, 2011

      First published in Great Britain by Voyager in 2000

      Copyright © George R.R. Martin 2000

      Cover layout design © HarperCollinsPublishers Ltd 2014. HBO and related service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.

      Cover photographs © Scott S. Warren / National Geographic Society / Corbis

      George R.R. Martin asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work

      A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

      This novel is entirely a work of fiction. The names, characters and incidents portrayed in it are the work of the author’s imagination. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events or localities is entirely coincidental.

      All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. By payment of the required fees, you have been granted the non-exclusive, non-transferable right to access and read the text of this e-book on-screen. No part of this text may be reproduced, transmitted, down-loaded, decompiled, reverse engineered, or stored in or introduced into any information storage and retrieval system, in any form or by any means, whether electronic or mechanical, now known or hereinafter invented, without the express written permission of HarperCollins.

      Source ISBN: 9780006479901

      Ebook Edition © April 2012 ISBN: 9780007447756

      Version: 2016-09-27

      Praise for A Song of Ice and Fire:

      ‘This is one of those rare and effortless reads.’

ROBIN HOBB

      ‘George R. R. Martin is one of our very best writers, and this is one of his very best books.’

RAYMOND E. FEIST

      ‘Such a splendid tale. I read my eyes out – I couldn’t stop till I’d finished and it was dawn.’

ANNE MCCAFFREY

      ‘George Martin is assuredly a new master craftsman in the guild of heroic fantasy.’

KATHARINE KERR

      ‘Few created worlds are as imaginative and diverse.’

JANNY WURTS

      Dedication

      For Phyllis who made me put the dragons in

      A NOTE ON CHRONOLOGY

      A Song of Ice and Fire is told through the eyes of characters who are sometimes hundreds or even thousands of miles apart from one another. Some chapters cover a day, some only an hour; others might span a fortnight, a month, half a year. With such a structure, the narrative cannot be strictly sequential; sometimes important things are happening simultaneously, a thousand leagues apart.

      In the case of the volume now in hand, the reader should realize that the opening chapters of A Storm of Swords do not follow the closing chapters of A Clash of Kings so much as overlap them. I open with a look at some of the things that were happening on the Fist of the First Men, at Riverrun, Harrenhal, and on the Trident while the Battle of the Blackwater was being fought at King’s Landing, and during its aftermath…

George R.R. Martin

      MAPS

      PROLOGUE

      The day was grey and bitter cold, and the dogs would not take the scent. The big black bitch had taken one sniff at the bear tracks, backed off, and skulked back to the pack with her tail between her legs. The dogs huddled together miserably on the riverbank as the wind snapped at them. Chett felt it too, biting through his layers of black wool and boiled leather. It was too bloody cold for man or beast, but here they were. His mouth twisted, and he could almost feel the boils that covered his cheeks and neck growing red and angry. I should be safe back at the Wall, tending the bloody ravens and making fires for old Maester Aemon. It was the bastard Jon Snow who had taken that from him, him and his fat friend Sam Tarly. It was their fault he was here, freezing his bloody balls off with a pack of hounds deep in the haunted forest.

      “Seven hells.” He gave the leashes a hard yank to get the dogs’ attention. “Track, you bastards. That’s a bear print. You want some meat or no? Find!” But the hounds only huddled closer, whining. Chett snapped his short lash above their heads, and the black bitch snarled at him. “Dog meat would taste as good as bear,” he warned her, his breath frosting with every word.

      Lark the Sisterman stood with his arms crossed over his chest and his hands tucked up into his armpits. He wore black wool gloves, but he was always complaining how his fingers were frozen. “It’s too bloody cold to hunt,” he said. “Bugger this bear, he’s not worth freezing over.”

      “We can’t go back emptyhand, Lark,” rumbled Small Paul through the brown whiskers that covered most of his face. “The Lord Commander wouldn’t like that.” There was ice under the big man’s squashed pug nose, where his snot had frozen. A huge hand in a thick fur glove clenched tight around the shaft of a spear.

      “Bugger that Old Bear too,” said the Sisterman, a thin man with sharp features and nervous eyes. “Mormont will be dead before daybreak, remember? Who cares what he likes?”

      Small Paul blinked his black little eyes. Maybe he had forgotten, Chett thought; he was stupid enough to forget most anything. “Why do we have to kill the Old Bear? Why don’t we just go off and let him be?”

      “You think he’ll let us be?” said Lark. “He’ll hunt us down. You want to be hunted, you great muttonhead?”

      “No,” said Small Paul. “I don’t want that. I don’t.”

      “So you’ll kill him?” said Lark.

      “Yes.” The huge man stamped the butt of his spear on the frozen riverbank. “I will. He shouldn’t hunt us.”

      The Sisterman took his hands from his armpits and turned to Chett. “We need to kill all the officers, I say.”

      Chett was sick of hearing it. “We been over this. The Old Bear dies, and Blane from the Shadow Tower. Grubbs and Aethan as well, their ill luck for drawing the watch, Dywen and Bannen for their tracking, and Ser Piggy for the ravens. That’s all. We kill them quiet, while they sleep. One scream and we’re wormfood, every one of us.” His boils were red with rage. “Just do your bit and see that your cousins do theirs. And Paul, try and remember, it’s third watch, not second.”

      “Third watch,” the big man said, through hair and frozen snot. “Me and Softfoot. I remember, Chett.”

      The moon would be black tonight, and they had jiggered the watches so as to have eight of their own standing sentry, with two