Архитектура

Различные книги в жанре Архитектура

Confronting Suburbanization. Urban Decentralization in Postsocialist Central and Eastern Europe

Ludek Sykora

This fascinating book explains the processes of suburbanization in the context of post-socialist societies transitioning from one system of socio-spatial order to another. Case studies of seven Central and Eastern Europe city regions illuminate growth patterns and key conditions for the emergence of sprawl. Breaks new ground, offering a systematic approach to the analysis of the global phenomenon of suburbanization in a post-socialist context Tracks the boom of the post-socialist suburbs in seven CEE capital city regions – Budapest, Ljubljana, Moscow, Prague, Sofia, Tallinn, and Warsaw Situates the experience of the CEE countries in the broader context of global urban change Case studies examine the phenomenon of suburbanization along four main vectors of analysis related to development patterns, driving forces, consequences and impacts, and management of suburbanization Highlights the critical importance of public policies and planning on the spread of suburbanization

Pavilions, Pop Ups and Parasols. The Impact of Real and Virtual Meeting on Physical Space

Leon Schaik van

Around the world, a new architectural form is emerging. In public places a progressive architecture is being commissioned to promote open-ended, undetermined, lightly programmed or un-programmed interactions between people. This new phenomenon of architectural form – Pavilions, Pop-Ups and Parasols – is presaged by rapidly changing social relationships flowing from social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The nexus between real and virtual meeting is effectively being reinvented by innovative and creative architectural practices. People meet in new and responsive ways, architects meet their clients in new forums, knowledge is ‘met’ and achieved in new and interactive frameworks. It contrasts bluntly with the commercially structured interactions of shopping malls and the increasingly deliberate interactions available in cultural institutions. These experiences imbue a new type of client; casually engaged, flocking, hacking, crowd funding and self-helping. Contributors include: Rob Bevan, Pia Ednie-Brown, Roan Ching-Yueh, Dan Hill, Martyn Hook, Minsuk Cho, Andrea Kahn, Felicity Scott, Akira Suzuki Contributing architects include: Alisa Andrasek/Biothing, Peter Cook/CRAB studio, CJ Lim/Studio 8, Tom Holbrook/5th Studio, Matthias Hollwich/HWKN, Mamou-Mani Architects, Benedetta Tagliabue/EMBT

Building Information Modeling. BIM in Current and Future Practice

Karen Kensek

The bright future and exciting possibilities of BIM Many architects and engineers regard BIM as a disruptive force, changing the way building professionals design, build, and ultimately manage a built structure. With its emphasis on continuing advances in BIM research, teaching, and practice, Building Information Modeling: BIM in Current and Future Practice encourages readers to transform disruption to opportunity and challenges them to reconsider their preconceptions about BIM. Thought leaders from universities and professional practice composed essays exploring BIM's potential to improve the products and processes of architectural design including the structure and content of the tools themselves. These authors provide insights for assessing the current practice and research directions of BIM and speculate about its future. The twenty-six chapters are thematically grouped in six sections that present complementary and sometimes incompatible positions: Design Thinking and BIM BIM Analytics Comprehensive BIM Reasoning with BIM Professional BIM BIM Speculations Together, these authors provide stimulating ideas regarding new directions in building information modeling.

Managing Built Heritage. The Role of Cultural Values and Significance

Derek Worthing

This new edition examines management of built heritage through the use of values-led decision making, based on an understanding of the significance of the cultural asset. It considers how significance is assessed and used as an effective focus and driver for management strategies and processes. The authors consider key policies and procedures that need to be implemented to help ensure effective management. The book will be useful for specialists in built heritage – conservation officers, heritage managers, architects, planners, engineers and surveyors – as well as for facilities and estates managers whose building stock includes protected or designated structures or buildings in conservation or other historic areas. describes management strategies and tools for a wide range of built heritage assets a reflective and informative guide on current conservation management explains how understanding and using conservation values (significance ) is essential to the protection of the built heritage uses real-life examples to draw out best practice

Signage and Wayfinding Design. A Complete Guide to Creating Environmental Graphic Design Systems

Chris Calori

A new edition of the market-leading guide to signage and wayfinding design This new edition of Signage and Wayfinding Design: A Complete Guide to Creating Environmental Graphic Design Systems has been fully updated to offer you the latest, most comprehensive coverage of the environmental design process—from research and design development to project execution. Utilizing a cross-disciplinary approach that makes the information relevant to architects, interior designers, landscape architects, graphic designers, and industrial designers alike, the book arms you with the skills needed to apply a standard, proven design process to large and small projects in an efficient and systematic manner. Environmental graphic design is the development of a visually cohesive graphic communication system for a given site within the built environment. Increasingly recognized as a contributor to well-being, safety, and security, EGD also extends and reinforces the brand experience. Signage and Wayfinding Design provides you with Chris Calori's proven «Signage Pyramid» method, which makes solving complex design problems in a comprehensive signage program easier than ever before. Features full-color design throughout with 100+ new images from real-world projects Provides an in-depth view of design thinking applied to the EGD process Explains the holistic development of sign information, graphic, and hardware systems. Outlines the latest sign material, lighting, graphic application, and digital communication technologies Highlights code and updated ADA considerations If you're a design professional tasked with communicating meaningful information in the built environment, this vital resource has you covered.

Standards of Practice in Construction Specifying

Nina Giglio M.

Construction Specifications provide critical information necessary to convey the design intent of the Architect and the legally enforceable contract requirements. Many factors must be considered by the Architect in the development of written construction documents, including project delivery method, project ownership, sustainability, and code requirements. This companion guide to the 2013 AIA National Convention Presentation “Architect’s Guide to Construction Specifications” provides excerpts from important industry publications regarding the preparation of construction documents. Material was carefully selected from the following books: – CSI Construction Specifications Practice Guide – Architect’s Guide to the US National CAD Standard – CSI Construction Contract Administration Practice Guide – Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice 14e Additional excerpts have been provided from CSI Formats to provide an overview of organizational standards for Specifications including: – MasterFormat – SectionFormat/PageFormat – PPDFormat Added material includes examples for comment document types, which can also be used as templates: Outline Specification; Short Form Specification; Certification and Seals Page; and Addendum This e-only book is an essential companion to the presentation or can stand alone as a necessary reference providing users ready access to key understanding of the methods of specifying; organizing structures for building information; and other components that should be considered in the preparation of a project manual.

Constructions. An Experimental Approach to Intensely Local Architectures

Michael Hensel

The current trend for constructing experimental structures is now an international phenomenon. It has been taken up worldwide by design professionals, researchers, educators and students alike. There exist, however, distinct and significant tendencies within this development that require further investigation. This issue of AD takes on this task by examining one of the most promising trajectories in this area, the rise of intensely local architectures. In his seminal essay of 1983, Kenneth Frampton redefined Critical Regionalism by calling for an intensely local approach to architectural design. Today, Frampton’s legacy is regaining relevance for a specific body of work in practice and education focused on the construction of experimental structures. Could this ultimately provide the seeds for a compelling and alternative approach to sustainable design? Contributors include: Barbara Ascher, Peter Buchanan, Karl Otto Ellefsen, David Jolly Monge, Lisbet Harboe, David Leatherbarrow, Areti Markopoulou, Philip Nobel, Rodrigo Rubio, Søren S Sørensen, Defne Sunguroðlu Hensel. Featured practices: Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Rintala Eggertsson, SHoP, Studio Mumbai, TYIN tegnestue.

Empathic Space. The Computation of Human-Centric Architecture

Christian Derix

In recent years, questions of space have gained renewed momentum in architecture and urban design, as adaptation, densification and sustainable regeneration have become an increasing priority. While most computing-based design tends to emphasise the formal aspects of architecture, overlooking space and its users, the ‘original’ computational design approaches first spearheaded in the UK in the 1960s and 1970s tended to be focused on behavioural and occupational patterns. Over the last decade, a new generation of design research has emerged that has started to implement and validate previous investigations into spatial computation, aiming to understand how to design spatial configurations based on user experiences. This revives an interest in the experiential that was first explored in the early 20th century by German and Nordic organic architects, who invented design methods that correlated cognitive responses of buildings' occupants to spatial structure. The current revival of human-centric design, however, represents the first design approach that synthesises spatial design and algorithmic techniques with organic design thinking, which could also be regarded as a return to the ‘first principles' of architectural design. Contributors include: Paul Coates, Christian Derix, Olafur Eliasson, Lucy Helme, Bill Hillier, Åsmund Izaki, Prarthana Jagannath, Dan Montello, Juhani Pallasmaa, Philip Steadman and Guy Theraulaz. Featured Architects/Designers: Jussi Ängeslevä (Art+Com), Stan Allen, Aedas|R&D, Markus Braach (Kaisersrot), Hermann Hertzberger, Kazuhiro Kojima (Cat), Pablo Miranda and Rafi Segal.

Digital Property. Open-source Architecture

Antoine Picon

Even more than authorship, ownership is challenged by the rise of digital and computational methods of design and production. These challenges are simultaneously legal, ethical and economic. How are new methods of fabrication and manufacture going to irreversibly change not only ways of working, but also designers’ ethics and their stance on ownership? In his 2013 second-term State of the Union address, President Obama stated that 3D printing ‘has the potential to revolutionize the way we make almost everything’. Nowhere will the impact of 3D printing be felt greater than in the architectural and design communities. When anyone can print out an object or structure from a digital file, will designers still exert the same creative rights or will they need to develop new practice and payment models? As architecture becomes more collaborative with open-source processes, will the emphasis on signature as the basis of ownership remain relevant? How will wider teams working globally be accredited and compensated? This issue of AD explores this subject; it features the work of designers who are developing wholly new approaches to practice by exploring means of commercialising process-based products rather than objects. Contributors: Phil Bernstein, Mark Garcia, Antoine Picon, Carlo Ratti and David Ruy Featured architects: Francis Bitonti, Marjan Colletti, Wendy W Fok, Panagiotis Michalatos, Jose Sanchez, Thibault Schwartz, Aaron Sprecher, Feng Xu and Philip Yuan

Analogous and Digital

Otl Aicher

Otl Aicher (1922-1991) was an outstanding personality in modern design, he was a co-founder of the legendary Hochschule fur Gestaltung (HfG), the Ulm School of Design, Germany. His works since the fifties of the last century in the field of corporate design and his pictograms for the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich are major achievements in the visual communication of our times. «An integral component of Aicher's work is that it is anchored in a „philosophy of making“ inspired by such thinkers as Ockham, Kant or Wittgenstein, a philosophy concerned with the prerequisites and aims, the objects and claims, of design. Aicher's complete theoretical and practical writings on design (which include all other aspects of visual creativity, such as architecture) are available with this new edition of the classic work. If Aicher prefers the analogous and concrete to the digital and abstract he does it with a philosophical intention. He relativizes the role of pure reason. He criticizes the rationality of Modernism as a result of the dominance of purely abstract thinking. Anyone who prefers the abstract to the concrete does not only misunderstand the mutual dependence of concept and view. In Aicher's judgement he is also creating a false hierarchy, a rank order that is culturally fatal. Things that are digital and abstract are not greater, higher and more important than things that are analogous and concrete.» Wilhelm Vossenkuhl